Resource Highlight: The CORE Project e-textbook

The CORE Project e-textbook is an online textbook in Economics for college students created by economists from all over the world.  It’s a bit advanced to use as the sole text for high school students, but teachers should be able to use this resource in many different ways.

John Cassidy in The New Yorker writes:
The project is a collaborative effort that emerged after the world financial crisis of 2008–9, and the ensuing Great Recession, when many students (and teachers) complained that existing textbooks didn’t do a good job of explaining what was happening. In many countries, groups of students demanded an overhaul in how economics was taught, with less emphasis on free-market doctrines and more emphasis on real-world problems.

Of course, that criticism doesn’t apply to WorldView Software’s Economics — we’ve had the comprehensive Tutorial: Global Financial Crisis for years!

page explains CMOs, includes graphic
A page from the WorldView Software “Economics” Tutorial: Global Financial Crisis

Use Google to Tour the National Parks

To ease the transition back to school, you can pretend you’re still on vacation by using Google to “tour” the national parks through online exhibits.  These are artifacts from the parks that were curated in celebration of the National Park Service Centennial in 2016, showcasing one object from every national park museum collection.

For example, check out the collections from Colorado’s national parks, with everything from hiking safety helmets from the 1970s to a projectile point from ~6,000 B.C.E.  There are also short descriptions of why the object was chosen for the centennial.

You can use these objects to get your students back into “historian” mode: why were these objects chosen? Are there other objects that would have been more appropriate? Can they make a convincing case for the alternative?  And more: what was the object’s context when it was made? When it was used? When it was found? Now?

And technically, this is a different part of Google altogether, but you could wind up your mini-vacation with a virtual stroll on the beach: Fire Island National Seashore (which has an object in the NY collection), via Google Maps Street View:

 

 

 

 

WorldView Software and Canvas®

We are very pleased to announce that WorldView Software has been fully integrated with Canvas® from Instructure, Inc.!  Canvas® is an easy-to-use, cloud-based learning management system (LMS) that connects all the digital tools and resources teachers use into one simple place.

Use your Canvas® account to access our award-winning apps:

A screenshot of WorldView Software’s American History II program within the Canvas teacher’s edition.

You can now find us through the EduAppCenter, which is maintained by Canvas®.  We are also accessible from within Canvas® as an external app.  A consumer key and sharedsecret (password) are required for access.

Canvas® is the fastest-growing open online learning management system (LMS) in K-12 — it’s even been selected by North Carolina’s Department of Public Instruction as a tool teachers throughout the state can use to collaborate. If you’re in NC, our programs World History A & B, American History I & II, and U.S. Government with Economics are fully correlated to state standards and have been approved for use as both textbooks and supplements.

Canvas® LMS + WorldView content = learning!


BulbgraphOnOffArt images are a great way to introduce units: use them to generate questions on all sorts of topics!


Preview WorldView Software’s programs for free at company logohttp://www.worldviewsoftware.com/preview/

 

Resource Highlight: the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History

Time travel using art with the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: essays, art images and objects, and chronologies that use the Met’s fabulous collection to delve into the contexts that made the art possible.  For example, the featured image is “Bowl with Human Feet” and it is thousands of years old.

Period: Predynastic, Late Naqada l–Naqada II
Date: ca. 3900–3650 B.C.
Geography: From Egypt
Medium: Polished red pottery
Dimensions: diam. 13.2 x W. 13.7 x D. 9.8 cm (5 3/16 x 5 3/8 x 3 7/8 in.)
Credit Line: Rogers Fund, 1910
Accession Number: 10.176.113

Timeline situating the art in context.
Timeline situating the bowl in context.

The timelines have annotated entries that give more information about the society that produced the art.  (There are also links to publications and slideshows from the Met that feature the image or object.)  More generally, the essays cover topics as diverse as African Lost-Wax Casting through Great Plains Indians Musical Instruments to the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368).

How would your students explain today’s artworks?

Resource Highlight: Internet History Sourcebooks

Need primary sources? You can find a really diverse set of texts at the Internet History Sourcebooks Project at Fordham University, edited by Paul Halsall.

The collection is organized by time period: ancient, medieval, and modern; and by thematic unit: African history, East Asian history, global history, Indian history, Islamic history, Jewish history, history of science, women’s history, and LGBTQ history.  (Note that some of the material on this site is under copyright and used by permission, so check before using it in your own materials.)

You can find everything from translations from the world’s first known author, Enheduana, daughter of Sargon, ruler of Akkadia to Lou Gehrig’s farewell speech to baseball.

Resource Highlight: NYPL Map Warper

Nifty way to time travel using maps: use the Map Warper from the New York Public Library!

The featured image shows the location of WorldView Software’s offices in Nassau County, New York as they appeared in 1779 (on a map titled “A chorographical map of the province of New-York in North America, divided into counties, manors, patents and townships : exhibiting likewise all the private grants of land made and located in that Province“) and blended with a map from today.  Big difference!

You can play with maps going back to 1544, browse by location and layer, maps that have already been rectified or do it yourself, and you can play with the transparency (ours is at 60%).   What does your area look like?

Tuesday #EdTech Round-up

To give everyone a break from election-related news, here are some interesting #edtech things from around the web:

  • Using virtual reality to revisit the scene of Nagasaki post-atomic bomb: with the help of archival photos, Nagasaki University created a 3D model of the city that allows schoolchildren to explore a radius of about 500 yards around the bomb’s epicenter;
  • a lesson plan for coding an interactive map using Scratch from Ryan Smith on Brian Aspinall’s site (this is specifically for a map of Canada, but is customizable);
  • reviews of social studies apps you can use for enrichment from Common Sense;
  • an optimistic article from C|Net on how good online-only high schools can be when everything is working as intended;
  • and on that note, for people implementing online studies, a list of thoughtful questions from the blog Seattle Education that anyone involved with schools should be asking about privacy, the value and goals of data-driven pedagogy, and technology-mediated education in general.

Back to the election. Remember to vote!

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