Just for Fun: History in Color

If it’s too hot to think, grab some ice water and coloring pencils and relax by coloring images from historical collections. The #ColorOurCollections initiative of the New York Academy of Medicine was in February, but don’t worry if you missed it: the coloring books created for the social media event are still available online at http://library.nyam.org/colorourcollections/.

There were 120 institutions from around the world participating, including the Smithsonian, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Vatican, the National Museum – The Palace of the Grand Dukes of Lithuania, and Bodleian Libraries.  Be realistic or get as fantastic as you like!

And finally, a small bonus online activity: color in a page of the Gutenberg Bible at the Ransom Center at UTAustin

Page of Gutenberg Bible colored in online.

Resource Highlight: the IT History Society

The IT History Society http://www.ithistory.org/ is an international group of over 700 members working together to document, preserve, catalog, and research the history of Information Technology (IT). One of their most useful things for students and teachers on their site is an International Database of Historical and Archival Sites, where you can look up and research everything from pre-Apple history to ZZT-oop (an early in-game scripting programming language). The databases are listed alphabetically, and can be sorted by institution or country.

Data Visualization

The featured image is an example of first-rate data visualization. It depicts the totality of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, with a column for the number of people who embarked in a given year, and a column for the number of people who disembarked.  Not only is it clear and easy to read, but the use of a lighter color to denote “embarked” vs. a darker color for “disembarked” means that the difference — those who died during the Middle Passage — looks ghostly.

The graph is part of an interactive timeline from the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.  The database is an incredible compendium of information from shipping manifests, logs, and so on for over 27,000 voyages.

Learn more about the trans-Atlantic slave trade in WorldView Software’s World History A, particularly Chapter 20: The Age of New World Exploration, and Internet Project: Triangular Trade.


BulbgraphOnOffGuided essays lead students step-by-step through the essay writing process, from selecting the main idea to writing the conclusion.


Preview WorldView Software’s programs for free at company logohttp://www.worldviewsoftware.com/preview/

Resource Highlight: Hip Hop Sheet Music

If your class is researching issues in contemporary American society, you could create a soundtrack using already-recorded music — or you could get the sheet music and play it yourself.  To that end, believe it or not, there is a site that has sheet music for hip hop: http://www.hamienet.com/Hip-Hop/  The featured image above is an electric guitar track from Notorious B.I.G.’s “Mo Money, Mo Problems.”

And if there’s a song to which you want the notation, try creating it with Transcribe!, ScoreCloud, or TwelveKeys software (and remember to share it).

May 27, 1776

Abigail Adams writes to her husband John, distressed by the lack of letters from him.  “What can be the reason I have not heard from you since the 20 of April, and now tis the 27 of May. My anxious foreboding Heart fears every Evil…

At the same time, John is writing to Abigail:  “I have three of your Favours, before me—one of May 7., another of May 9. and a third of May 14th. The last has given me Relief from many Anxieties…

Source: May 27, 1776

[Other letters from their correspondence may be more famous, but I like this pair for the human touch revealed.  Too often, we fall into the “great man” trap of history, when it’s really decisions made by real, multi-dimensional people.]

Resource Highlight: National Repository of Online Courses (NROC)

The National Repository of Online Courses (NROC) is a library of online course content for students and faculty in higher education, high school and Advanced Placement. It’s a non-profit project of the Monterey Institute for Technology and Education, an education think tank that is well-funded by competency-based education advocates like the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  It also receives funding from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the James Irvine Foundation and from NROC member institutions.

Hippocampus.org has video presentations and interactive activities called simulations available in history, government, sociology, and economics.  These are openly available, and the content collections come from Chattanooga State University, National Geographic, Dallas Learning Solutions, the Virginia Historical Society, and Tom Christian and Thorp School District.

Marked as “contributor content” are the Statistics course and Religions of the World course.  These are available to NROC members only.

Resource Highlight: the Met Museum’s Open Access

Looking for digital images for your students to use in projects? The Metropolitan Museum of Art has made thousands of public domain images available.

On February 7, 2017, The Metropolitan Museum of Art implemented a new policy known as Open Access, which makes images of artworks it believes to be in the public domain widely and freely available for unrestricted use, and at no cost…We encourage you to explore the images of artworks the Museum believes to be in the public domain by visiting Collection and selecting the “Public Domain Artworks” filter in the left-hand column.

The featured image is a silk dress from the 1750s from the collection that is not currently on display.  For more information on the availability of images (and data from images that are still restricted), read the rest of their post here.